Can breathwork ‘cure’ PTSD, trauma, and racism?

Can breathwork ‘cure’ racism and other kinds of harmful bias?

Question from Stan Grof, pioneer in breathwork field and creator of Holotropic Breathing: “I wonder if you can say something about two aspects of the effect of the holotropic state on consciousness that are important from a therapeutic perspective…”

Dr. Dan Siegel on how Holotropic Breathing works from a neuroscientist’s perspective, in terms of brain anatomy and physiology.

How does Holotropic Breathing work? How is it that–regardless of the individuals’ background, age, race, culture, nationality, etc. the ‘holotropic state’ so consistently:

A) Provides conscious access to memories and other mental contents that are normally inaccessible to the conscious mind, and

B) Functions as a kind of radar in that it consistently seems to ‘select’ and activate material from the unconscious with extreme emotional charge– memories from traumatic events which have never been resolved?

*Recorded in 2015

We are never not broken

Akhilandeshvari by Paola Suarez
Akhilandeshvari by Paola Suarez

Transformation, in my experience, sometimes requires navigating through some nasty territory: “Joe, watch out for the alligators!” my friend Rich counseled me one day during my divorce. I’ve come to realize that the real value of meditation, breathwork, etc., is the way it builds resilience, the way it strengthens the ‘inner gyroscope.’ Resilience is only going to become more important as life speeds up and as we gain more and more power by way of technology. Resilience and transformative learning are what I strive to teach.


She who is never not broken. Akhilandeshvari is a Goddess whose power is in the heartbreak, the soulbreak, and all the breaks life deals us. Now that I know of her, I am grateful to have Akhilandeshvari’s energy to work with when I feel shattered and broken. She reminds me to see these times as opportunities to grow and remake myself. -Paola Suarez

Never Not Broken

Akhilandeshwari reminds us that in transitions, when we are metamorphosing and are no longer the caterpillar and not yet the butterfly, there is a wonderful opportunity to choose how we want to put ourselves back together. How will we recreate ourselves? How will we transform our old hurts, current pains, and future goals? How will we ever grow and change if we already had this all figured out? We are constantly breaking down to build back up an authentic self.

-http://www.geneticsexualattraction.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2605

Hindi goddess Akhilandeshvari
Hindi goddess Akhilandeshvari
"Watch out for the alligators, Joe!" -Joseph Roberson 2012
“Watch out for the alligators, Joe!” -Joseph Roberson 2012
Akhilandeshvari Nataraj -Joseph Roberson 2014
Akhilandeshvari Nataraj -Joseph Roberson 2014
Akhilandeshvari & Wheel of Fortune -Joseph Roberson 2014

SvaDharma means…

Having confidence in your dream and the courage to pursue it. That’s SvaDharma!

Dream the impossible. Pursue it like a madman. Relinquish every expectation about any of it actually turning out the way you dreamed.

Richerd-Parker-hazard

It is far better to pursue your own dream, your own destiny, your own “Personal Legend,” than to pursue one prescribed for you by others. There is infinitely more value–to yourself, to those around you, and to the world–than to go along with the fate laid out for you others. Even if they really do have your best interest at heart. That’s going to hell in a handbasket!

Even if you fail miserably at accomplishing your SvaDharma, you succeed in living with authenticity, courage, and faith. That’s worth more than gold.

So, friend, be brave. Stay hungry. Stay just foolish enough to hazard something you have no idea idea how to accomplish. Be bold. Remember that there are forces hovering nearby anxiously waiting the signal to flow in and assist. The moment you commit, the moment you take a stand for your highest and deepest desire, miracles commence. Expect them!

Mindfulness and The Triune Brain

I just stumbled upon this wonderfully playful, yet spot-on, explanation of what we are doing when we practice mindfulness. Wes Nisker, author and Buddhist meditation teacher, explains the Triune Brain theory and how, with mindfulness, we can learn to laugh at our own drama. What’s your movie?

NadaBrahma: love is an altered state

NadaBrahma-love-circle-600

Love may well be the ultimate altered state.

The term altered state usually implies something extremely different from day to day life. More often than not, drugs are involved. While my experiences with altered states have involved illegal drugs, that was long ago. Most of my experiences with altered states happen during meditation, breathwork, art-making, and love and sex.

The kind of altered state I’m describing in this post, however, is the experience of love that happens during the Altered States workshop. I did not always see altered states this way. I did not always think of this workshop as a way of creating spiritual love. That sounds odd and pretentious, don’t you think? But I have been led by the practice itself, by Osho’s NadaBrahma Meditation especially, to this conclusion. My experience leading this workshop many, many times has led me here.

What happens is, after 30 minutes of humming mmmmmmmm (like when we do endless Om but without the O sound), the body becomes a tuning fork. The gentle humming massages the organs and releases tensions. It feels as though the body is an empty reed, a wind instrument. Every body in the room vibrates together. This simple droning, these shared sea-waves of sound, interpenetrate each choral body.

In addition to this toning, I have added some things to the original meditation. I play the gong and provide verbal guidance. The gong complements and amplifies the humming. In particular, the gong vibrates the spine from base to crown. Its Chaladni patterns change as they move up and down the keyboard of chakras. This journey through the chakras continues up and down the spiral staircase until we arrive and settle into the heart. By this point the humming, the vibrating, and the chakra meditation have delivered you home to yourself. I don’t know the details, but I understand that part of the blissed-out state here comes from increased carbon dioxide in the blood. I have read studies documenting such elevated levels of carbon dioxide, relative to the ratio of oxygen, in meditators. Whatever the physiological basis, the experience is heavenly.

At the end of this powerful meditation, the heart chakra opens, radiating gold and green in every direction. You have become the sun. You know yourself to be the source of light, warmth, and love. And so is every other person around you! The room is ablaze with one sea-field of gold and green love energy. The group radiates as one!

Love is the ultimate altered state!

What is transformation?

1. In the world of business, leadership development, organizational development, change management, et al, the term transformation is the process whereby an unprecedented future is brought to reality. This created future is not mere change–improvement or fix of what has already happened in the past; nor is it predetermined, as is the case in a butterfly’s natural, albeit radical, metamorphosis.

2. In the world of spiritual growth–yoga, breathwork, meditation, et al–the term transformation seems to consistently denote metamorphosis–the process whereby one’s natural potential is brought to reality, as in the ubiquitous example of a butterfly. Typically, the goal in this kind of personal transformation is to remove whatever is in the way of an unfettered ‘natural state.’ This so-called natural state is typically said to be a state of happiness, wellbeing, joy, and, ultimately,  a transpersonal experience of Oneness.

The difference between these two meanings of transformation is outer vs. inner: in business, what is pursued is a specific state of affairs of the organization; in spiritual growth, on the other hand, what is pursued is a specific state of affairs of/within the individual. This is an oversimplification, of course; yet it effectively highlights the contrast.

How can these two disparate worlds of transformation enrich one another?

The Lure of Yoga: Avoiding the Soul

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. They will practice Indian yoga and all its exercises, observe a strict regimen of diet, learn the literature of the whole world – all because they cannot get on with themselves and have not the slightest faith that anything useful could ever come out of their own souls. Thus the soul has gradually been turned into a Nazareth from which nothing good can come.

-Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy

 

Evolutionary Imperative (Einstein quote)

“A human being is a part of a whole, called by us ‘Universe,’ a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest– a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely, but the striving for such achievement is in itself a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.”

–Albert Einstein